Billy Joe Shaver - CANCELLED

Billy Joe Shaver - CANCELLED

Ray Scott

Sat, April 22, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Cox Capitol Theatre

Macon, GA

$20.00 - $25.00

Off Sale

Billy Joe Shaver - CANCELLED
Billy Joe Shaver - CANCELLED
Billy Joe Shaver has never been a household name, but his songs became country standards during the '70s and his reputation among musicians and critics hasn't diminished during the ensuing decades.

One of the best synopses of Shaver's upbringing is his own song, "I Been to Georgia on a Fast Train." When he sings, "my grandma's old-age pension is the reason that I'm standing here today," he ain't kidding. The "good Christian raising" and "eighth grade education" — not to mention being abandoned by his parents shortly after being born, working on his uncles' farms instead of going to high school, and losing part of his fingers during a job at a sawmill — are all part of his life story. "I got all my country learning," he sings, "picking cotton, raising hell, and bailing hay."

After several trips between Texas andTennessee, he appeared one day in 1968 inBobby Bare's Nashville office, where he convinced Bare to listen to him play. Bareended up giving him a writing job and soon his songs began to see the light thanks toKris Kristofferson ("Good Christian Soldier"),Tom T. Hall ("Willie the Wandering Gypsy and Me"), Bare ("Ride Me Down Easy"), and later,the Allman Brothers ("Sweet Mama") and Elvis Presley ("You Asked Me To"). Shaver's real breakthrough, though, came in 1973 whenWaylon Jennings recorded an album composed almost entirely of Shaver's songs, Honky Tonk Heroes — largely considered the first true "outlaw" album.

Shaver's own debut album, Old Five and Dimers Like Me, was produced by Kristofferson in 1973. Along with the title track, it contained now-classic Shaver songs "Willie the Wandering Gypsy and Me" and the aforementioned "Georgia on a Fast Train." In 1978 Johnny Cash recorded "I'm Just an Old Chunk of Coal (But I'm Gonna Be a Diamond Some Day)," a song Shaver wrote just after he chose to give up drugs and booze and turned to God for help.

All Music Guide lists 23 albums, from 1973's Old Five & Dimers Like Me through 2007's Everybody's Brother. Among his many classic songs are "I'm Just an Old Chunk of Coal (But I'm Gonna Be a Diamond Some Day)," "Honky Tonk Heroes," "Georgia on a Fast Train," "Live Forever," "Tramp on Your Street," and "Try and Try Again."

In 1999, Shaver was invited to perform at theGrand Ole Opry. In 2005, Billy Joe Shaver performed on CMT Outlaws. In 2006, he was inducted into the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame. He recently served as spiritual advisor to Texas independent gubernatorial candidateKinky Friedman and his 2007 album "Everybody's Brother" was nominated for a GRAMMY. For his efforts, the Americana Music Association awarded him their Lifetime Achievement Award in Songwriting.

Shaver is truly one of the most respected living figures in American music. Bob Dylan, who rarely covers other writers, has often played Billy Joe's "Old Five And Dimers Like Me" in concert. Johnny Cash called him "my favorite songwriter." TheWashington Post noted, "when the country outlaws were collecting their holy writings, Billy Joe Shaver was carving out Exodus."
Ray Scott
Ray Scott
The digital music revolution has turned out to be a "Rayincarnation" for acclaimed country storyteller Ray Scott. While a label-free utopia where artistic merit trumps popular whims remains as unlikely as it always was, the internet age has allowed a certain kind of creator to connect with an audience and chart a self-determined course ... which helps explains why Scott has chosen to self-title his fourth album.
"This is sort of a regroup for me – not only artistically, but in terms of my career," he says. "My music and my sense of where it fits in the music business has really taken shape over the past several years. So this is an introduction to that for people who may not be familiar with me, and it's a defining of that vision for those who already know my music."
For many, Ray Scott needs no introduction. Warner Bros. released Scott's debut album My Kind Of Music in 2005 to enormous critical acclaim. The first single and title track cracked the top 40, but a combination of label politics and radio's reluctance to embrace his fresh approach to country traditions had him off the label less than two years later. But a funny thing happened on the way to post-label obscurity – a level of success many major label artists might envy.
Crazy Like Me (2008) was put together to have a project to sell on the road, but ended up getting strong critical reaction and surprising sales. Encouraged, Ray connected with producer Dave Brainard (Jerrod Niemann, Brandy Clark) to record Rayality (2011). The single "Those Jeans" received substantial airplay on SiriusXM and went on to sell a couple hundred thousand copies. "I kept writing and still had a pile of songs we didn't get to on Rayality," he says. "So we decided to amp things up and make a record exactly the way we wanted."
As result, Ray Scott follows its namesake's vision without deviation. "Every song is like a separate vignette in both subject matter and production, but it also exists as a complete body of work," Ray says. An obvious crowd-pleaser is the first single "Drinkin' Beer," which Scott co-wrote with Tony Mullins. Scott wrote the murder ballad "Papa And Mama" by himself, and enlisted Mark Stephen Jones to co-write "Ain't Always Thirsty," which is a product of Scott's painful divorce. "Tijuana Buzzkill" was actually written eight years ago. "It's a true story, right down to having my foot peed on by a Mexican guy," Scott says. As a whole, Ray Scott is the most descriptive name possible for the collection. "It's country music the way I interpret it," he says. "Every artist borrows and basically bastardizes whatever they grew up loving. In my case, it was a combination of a lot of great '70s country. My dad was a singer and I used to hear him do all that stuff.
"The good news is, the kind of music I'm making now is not age-specific. I'm not out there wiggling my ass for anybody, so it's about telling stories, making people smile and making them feel something. And I can do that until I grow up, if the fans will still have me.
"I understand that sometimes the business has a place for what I do and sometimes it doesn't," Rays says. "But what I do has kept me alive out there in the world because it is different enough that people get passionate about it. They stick with it. I don't sound like everybody else, and I don't want to."
Venue Information:
Cox Capitol Theatre
382 Second Street
Macon, GA, 31201
http://www.coxcapitoltheatre.com/